Nyc Department Of Education Jobs, Employment

It’s been a very eventful year for these of us who advocate for much better schools – across the country, but particularly here in New York. The biggest typical 4th grade classes, all far above the UFT cap of 32, are at: PS 221 Toussaint L’Ouverture, in D17 Brooklyn (ICT, 39 and GenEd, 37) PS 96 in D27 Queens (GenEd, 37) PS 195 Manhattan Beach in D22 Brooklyn (G&T, 36) PS 21 Philip H. Sheridan in D11 Bronx (GenEd, 35.5) PS 9 Teunis Gl Bergen in D13 Brooklyn (ICT, 35) PS 195 Manhattan Beach in D22 Brooklyn (GenEd, 35), and PS 86 in D28 Queens (ICT, 35).

According to DOE information, the biggest 6th grade classes, all far above the union cap of 33 for non-Title I schools (30 in Title I), are all in the Bronx: the Urban Assembly College for Applied Math and Science in D9 (ICT at 85) Antonia Pantoja Preparatory Academy: A College Board College in D11 (ICT, 57) Pelham Academy Of Academics And Community Engagement in D11 (GenEd, 37.5) and MS 180 Dr. Daniel Hale Williams in D11 (ICT, 35).

The schools with the largest 8th grade class sizes, according to DOE data, are Antonia Pantoja Preparatory Academy: A College Board School (ICT, 72) Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Secondary School for Arts and Technology in D24 Queens (GenEd, 54) MS 301 Paul L. Dunbar in D8 Bronx (GenEd, 36) Conselyea Preparatory College in D14 Brooklyn (ICT, 36) and MS 180 Dr. Daniel Hale Williams in D11 Bronx (ICT, 35).

Though he nevertheless owes NYC schools over $two billion from the Campaign for Fiscal Equity choice, and statewide he owes schools over $five billion, he now says he will not boost funding unless the Legislature approves tuition tax credits to private schools, equivalent to vouchers, raising the cap on charter schools by 1 hundred and eliminating any regional restrictions, which could mean up to 250 more charter schools targeted to NYC, with each and every 1 guaranteed free of charge facilities at the city expense.

In addition, the Governor is insisting on a statewide teacher evaluation technique that takes practically all authority out of district and principal hands, basing 50% of a teacher’s ratings on student test scores on the hugely fallible state exams, with only 15% based on the principal’s assessment, and the other 35% on independent evaluators, pre-chosen by the state but paid for by the district.